AMPHIBIAWEB
Breviceps acutirostris
Strawberry rain frog
family: Brevicipitidae

© 2005 Arie van der Meijden (1 of 2)
Conservation Status (definitions)
IUCN (Red List) Status Least Concern (LC)
CITES
Other International Status None
National Status None
Regional Status None

Country distribution from AmphibiaWeb's database: South Africa

 

View distribution map using BerkeleyMapper.

   

From the Encyclopedia of Life account:

Distribution

B. acutirostris is restricted to the southwestern ranges of the Cape fold mountains. The most westerly range in which it occurs is the Hottentotsholland Mountains, the most easterly the Langeberg Mountains; these ranges also represent the northern limits of the species (Text from Minter et al., 2004, © SI/MAB Biodiversity Program).


Author: Harrison, J.A.
License: http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/3.0/

Habitat and Ecology

B. acutirostris occurs only in areas of high precipitation in uplands and mountains, both in Mountain Fynbos and in Afromontane Forest. Where mountains reach the coast, the species can occur at sea level (Text from Minter et al., 2004, © SI/MAB Biodiversity Program).


Author: Harrison, J.A.
License: http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/3.0/

Reproduction

Calling occurs both at night and during the day, usually during and after rain showers in winter and spring (June–November), but dense mist may be sufficient to stimulate calling. In Grootvadersbosch forest, males have been observed calling from above the ground, on top of logs. In fynbos, the species has been found calling above ground in dense vegetation, and from short burrows situated below low, covering vegetation. Adhesive amplexus is employed during mating.

An amplexed pair, with a freshly laid egg mass comprising 24 eggs, was unearthed in Mountain Fynbos in the Boosmansbos Wilderness Area, on 22 October 1986 (D. McDonald pers. comm.). The pair was found in a chamber at the lower end of a network of tunnels covering an area of about one square meter. Some branches of the tunnels ended blindly while others formed loops off the main tunnel leading to the egg chamber. The nest site was located on a cool, moist slope in sandy loam soil, covered by prostrate Cliffortia ferruginea. The eggs measured 6.5–7.8 mm (mean = 7) in diameter (L.R. Minter unpubl. data; text from Minter et al., 2004, © SI/MAB Biodiversity Program).


Author: Harrison, J.A.
License: http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/3.0/

Threats

The montane habitat of B. acutirostris is generally little disturbed and occurs within a number of protected areas such as the Marloth Nature Reserve, Boosmansbos Wilderness Area and Grootvadersbosch State Forest. Thus, this species is not threatened (Text from Minter et al., 2004, © SI/MAB Biodiversity Program).


Author: Harrison, J.A.
License: http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/3.0/