AMPHIBIAWEB
Breviceps rosei
Rose's rain frog
family: Brevicipitidae

© 2011 Martin Pickersgill (1 of 2)
Conservation Status (definitions)
IUCN (Red List) Status Least Concern (LC)
CITES
Other International Status None
National Status None
Regional Status None

Country distribution from AmphibiaWeb's database: South Africa

 

View distribution map using BerkeleyMapper.

   

From the Encyclopedia of Life account:

Distribution

B. rosei has a coastal distribution; nowhere does the species occur more than 45 km inland. The distribution extends from Lambert’s Bay on the west coast, to Gouritsmond on the south coast. Crawford and Dyer (2000) found that the species is common on Robben Island (Text from Minter et al., 2004, © SI/MAB Biodiversity Program).


Author: Harrison, J.A.
License: http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/3.0/

Habitat and Ecology

B. rosei occurs in coastal lowlands and lower slopes in the Fynbos and Thicket biomes; it does not extend into the Succulent Karoo Biome to the north. It inhabits sandy substrates in Dune Thicket and probably in Limestone Fynbos and Sand Plain Fynbos, although occurrence in the latter two veld types, sensu stricto, requires confirmation. This species occurs in well-vegetated areas and is not recorded from unstable dunes, or places where a coastal plain is absent and Mountain Fynbos descends to the coast (Text from Minter et al., 2004, © SI/MAB Biodiversity Program).


Author: Harrison, J.A.
License: http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/3.0/

Associations

Some authors follow Poynton (1964) in recognizing two subspecies, that is, B. r. rosei northwest of False Bay, and B. r. vansoni east of False Bay, on the basis of differences in colour pattern, but these differences do not appear to be consistent (Passmore and Carruthers 1995). Field and molecular studies are required to clarify the status of these taxa (Text from Minter et al., 2004, © SI/MAB Biodiversity Program).


Author: Harrison, J.A.
License: http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/3.0/

Activity and Special Behaviors

Channing (2001) suggests that aestivation probably takes place during the dry season. This species also produces a cocoon to protect itself against dessication (Text from Minter et al., 2004, © SI/MAB Biodiversity Program).


Author: Harrison, J.A.
License: http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/3.0/

Advertisement Call

Calling occurs both at night and during the day, mainly during and after rain showers in winter and spring (June–November). Dense mist may be sufficient to trigger calling. Males have been observed to call from elevated positions in bushes and sedges, up to a meter above the ground (FitzSimons 1946; Channing 2001.). When disturbed, these individuals will sometimes drop to the ground and lie still (Text from Minter et al., 2004, © SI/MAB Biodiversity Program).


Author: Harrison, J.A.
License: http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/3.0/

Reproduction

Adhesive amplexus lasts for four or five days and the male assists the female in burrowing into the sand with movements of his feet (Channing 2001). Other details of breeding are not known (Text from Minter et al., 2004, © SI/MAB Biodiversity Program).


Author: Harrison, J.A.
License: http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/3.0/

IUCN Red List Category and Justification of Conservation Status

B. rosei is not threatened at present. However, much of its habitat has been, and continues to be, destroyed by coastal and agricultural development and by the spread of invasive alien vegetation, especially Rooikrans Acacia cyclops. Given the species’ narrow distribution range, it is clear that its populations are vulnerable to fragmentation and local extinction (Text from Minter et al., 2004, © SI/MAB Biodiversity Program).


Author: Harrison, J.A.
License: http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/3.0/