AMPHIBIAWEB
Conraua robusta
family: Conrauidae

© 2010 Vaclav Gvozdik (1 of 7)
Conservation Status (definitions)
IUCN (Red List) Status Vulnerable (VU)
CITES
Other International Status None
National Status None
Regional Status None

Country distribution from AmphibiaWeb's database: Cameroon, Nigeria

 

View distribution map using BerkeleyMapper.

   

From the Encyclopedia of Life account:

Summary

Conraua robusta is a large frog that has a limited range in Nigeria and Cameroon, living near or breeding in rapidly flowing streams and rivers. This species is sought for its food value in the bushmeat market and is classified as Vulnerable not only from the threat of overharvesting, but from ongoing destruction of habitat.


Author: Hogan, C.Michael
License: http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/3.0/

Distribution

Conraua robusta occurs in the foothills of the main mountain block in western Cameroon (excluding Mount Cameroon). It is known from Nkongjock, Nta Ali, the Bamileke Plateau, Mount Manenguba, Mount Kupe, and the Rumpi Hills. It has also been recorded from the Oban Hills in Nigeria. Its altitudinal range is 750 to 1400 metres above mean sea level (Amiet & Gartshore, 2004). This uncommon anuran is endemic to two modest sized ecoregions that occur in parts of Nigeria and Cameroon: the Cross-Sanaga-Bioko coastal forests (Hogan, 2013) and the Cameroonian highland forests.


Author: Hogan, C.Michael
License: http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/3.0/

Habitat and Ecology

C. robusta lives in and near cold, fast-flowing freshwater streams, in grasslands as well as forests. It does not require tree cover, and in Nkongsamba it can even be found in populated areas. It prefers colder, faster water than does C. goliath, and the tadpoles of C. robusta thrive in rapid, even torrential, water. Around Nkongsamba, Conraua robusta, C. crassipes and C. goliath occur sympatrically (Amiet & Gartshore, 2004).


Author: Hogan, C.Michael
License: http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/3.0/

Population Biology

The species is considered uncommon, and its populations are limited to two modest sized ecoregions within Nigeria and Cameroon: the Cross-Sanaga-Bioko coastal forests and the Cameroonian highland forests (Amiet & Gartshore, 2004; Hogan, 2013).


Author: Hogan, C.Michael
License: http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/3.0/

IUCN Red List Category and Justification of Conservation Status

The IUCN has classified this species as Vulnerable [B1ab(iii)+2ab(iii) ver 3.1], since the taxon's Extent of Occurrence is less than 20,000 km2 and its Area of Occupancy is less than 2,000 km2, its distribution is severely fragmented, and there is a continuing decline in the extent and quality of its habitat (Amiet & Gartshore, 2004). The species is regarded as uncommon, and its population is deemed to be declining.


Author: Hogan, C.Michael
License: http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/3.0/

Trends

The population trend of C. robusta is deemed to be in decline due to unsustainable harvesting and loss of habitat (Amiet & Gartshore, 2004).


Author: Hogan, C.Michael
License: http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/3.0/

Threats

C. robusta is a large anuran that is harvested for food and is considered a delicacy by local peoples in Cameroon and Nigeria. Despite being somewhat adaptable, it is thought to be adversely affected by the loss of forest habitat cleared for agriculture, logging, and human settlement; the sedimentation of its breeding streams is also having a detrimental impact on the species reproduction (Amiet & Gartshore, 2004).


Author: Hogan, C.Michael
License: http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/3.0/

Conservation Actions and Management

C. robusta occurs in the Cross River National Park in Nigeria. According to the IUCN, there is a need to work with local communities to ensure that the harvest of this species from the wild is managed sustainably, since this anuran is taken from the wild as food for indigenous peoples (Amiet & Gartshore, 2004).


Author: Hogan, C.Michael
License: http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/3.0/