AMPHIBIAWEB
Hyla versicolor
Eastern Gray Treefrog
Subgenus: Dryophytes
family: Hylidae
subfamily: Hylinae
Taxonomic Notes: Duellman et al. (Zootaxa 2016) treated two major clades as genera; AmphibiaWeb treats these two clades as subgenera(Hyla in the Old World; Dryophytes in the New World and East Asia), thus stabilizing traditional taxonomy.

John White
© 2003 John White (1 of 53)
Conservation Status (definitions)
IUCN (Red List) Status Least Concern (LC)
NatureServe Status Use NatureServe Explorer to see status.
CITES No CITES Listing
Other International Status None
National Status None
Regional Status None

 

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From the IUCN Red List Species Account:

 

Range Description

This species' geographic range is not precisely determined, although it covers much of the eastern USA and southeastern Canada. It is sympatric with Hyla chrysoscelis in Wisconsin, south-central U.S., and probably many other areas. See Little et al. (1989) for distribution in West Virginia, southern Ohio, and southwestern Pennsylvania. See McAlpine et al. (1991) for information on distribution in eastern Maine and southwestern New Brunswick.

Habitat and Ecology

This species occurs in various kinds of wooded and forested habitats. It is both arboreal and terrestrial. It hides in tree holes, under bark, in rotten logs, under leaves and under tree roots when inactive. Eggs and larvae develop in shallow woodland ponds and marshes, puddles, ponds in forest clearings, swamps, bogs and many other kinds of permanent or temporary waters lacking a significant current, including ponds created through excavation by humans. In northern Minnesota, successful reproduction in acidic bog water either does not occur or is a rare event (Karns 1992). In central Ontario, embryos and larvae exhibited a high degree of acid tolerance (J. Herpetol. 26:1-6).

Population

The total adult population size is unknown but large and probably stable.

Population Trend

Stable

Major Threats

No major threats are known. Introduced Bluegill Sunfish might cause declines in larval tree frog abundance (Smith et al. 1999), and it is found in the pet trade.

Conservation Actions

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Taxonomic Notes

This species is not distinguished from the very similar Hyla chrysoscelis in most published literature; it is distinguished by chromosomes, erythrocyte size (Matson 1990), and call characteristics.

Citation

IUCN SSC Amphibian Specialist Group 2015. Hyla versicolor. In: IUCN 2014

 

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