AMPHIBIAWEB
Leptodactylodon albiventris
family: Arthroleptidae

  hear Fonozoo call

Conservation Status (definitions)
IUCN (Red List) Status Vulnerable (VU)
CITES
Other International Status None
National Status None
Regional Status None

Country distribution from AmphibiaWeb's database: Cameroon

 

View distribution map using BerkeleyMapper.

   

From the Encyclopedia of Life account:

Etymology

This species is named for the Latin 'albidus' meaning whitish and 'ventris' meaning belly referring to the whitish underside.


Author: Zimkus, Breda
License: http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/3.0/

Taxonomic Notes

Leptodactylodon bueanus was considered a synonym of L. albiventris by Amiet (1987), but Amiet and Dowsett-Lemaire (2000) considered them to be separate species.


Author: Zimkus, Breda
License: http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/3.0/

Distribution

This species is known only from the western edge of the southern Cameroon plateau, though it might occur more widely than current records suggest (Amiet, 2004).


Author: Zimkus, Breda
License: http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/3.0/

Morphology

A series of vomerine teeth are present that are nearly straight, widely separated in the middle, and not extending outwards beyond the choanae. The head is much depressed and broader than long. The snout is short and rounded. No canthus rostralis is present. The eye is moderate. The interorbital region is approximately one and a half times as broad as the upper eyelid. The tympanum is indistinct, its diameter about half that of the eye. Fingers are short, with slightly swollen tips. The first and second fingers are equal in length. The toes are moderately long, and the tips are dilated into small discs. Subarticular and inner metatarsal tubercles are feebly prominent. The tibio-tarsal articulation reaches the posterior border of the eye. The skin is smooth. The dorsum is dark brown or black with small, round, white spots on the sides. Hind limbs have light spots or marblings. The venter is white, and the throat is sometimes marbled with brown (Boulenger, 1905).


Author: Zimkus, Breda
License: http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/3.0/

Size

The holotype is 25 mm from snout to vent (Boulenger, 1905).


Author: Zimkus, Breda
License: http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/3.0/

Habitat and Ecology

This is a species of lowland rainforest in hilly country found at altitudes between 300 and 1,000m asl. It is not known to what extent it can adapt to forest disturbance (Amiet, 2004).


Author: Zimkus, Breda
License: http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/3.0/

Population Biology

It is not common (Amiet, 2004).


Author: Zimkus, Breda
License: http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/3.0/

Reproduction

It breeds in streams, and the males call from rocky areas (under rocks or in cracks) close to small streams (Amiet, 2004).


Author: Zimkus, Breda
License: http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/3.0/

IUCN Red List Category and Justification of Conservation Status

This species is categorized as Vulnerable because its Extent of Occurrence is probably less than 20,000 km2, its distribution is probalby severely fragmented, and the quality and extent of its forest habitat in Cameroon and Equatorial Guinea is declining (Amiet, 2004).


Author: Zimkus, Breda
License: http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/3.0/

Trends

Populations of this species are decreasing (Amiet, 2004).


Author: Zimkus, Breda
License: http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/3.0/

Threats

The major threat to this species is habitat loss from smallholder farming activities and logging (Amiet, 2004).


Author: Zimkus, Breda
License: http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/3.0/

Conservation Actions and Management

It is not known from any protected areas, though it might occur in Campo-Ma'an National Park. There is a need for improved habitat protection at sites at where the species is known to occur (Amiet, 2004).


Author: Zimkus, Breda
License: http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/3.0/