AMPHIBIAWEB
Mertensophryne micranotis
family: Bufonidae

© 2004 Robert C. Drewes (1 of 3)
Conservation Status (definitions)
IUCN (Red List) Status Least Concern (LC)
CITES
Other International Status None
National Status None
Regional Status None

Country distribution from AmphibiaWeb's database: Kenya, Mozambique, Tanzania, United Republic of

 

View distribution map using BerkeleyMapper.

   

From the Encyclopedia of Life account:

Size

This species is up to 24 mm in snout-vent length (Harper et al., 2010).


Author: Zimkus, Breda
License: http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/3.0/

Diagnostic Description

This is a small toad. The dorsum is dark brown with conspicuous light patches on the scapular and sacral regions. There is no tympanum and the parotid glands are indistinct. The ventral surface is heavily marked. Males have rough thumbs that aid in clasping the female during mating. The outer toe is reduced. Toes lack webbing (Text from Harper et al., 2010).


Author: Zimkus, Breda
License: http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/3.0/

Comparisons

M. micranotis is very similar to all other species in the genus, but can be distinguished from the other species because it lacks toe webbing, does not have distinctly raised parotid glands and has a dark belly and mottled throat (Text from Harper et al., 2010).


Author: Zimkus, Breda
License: http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/3.0/

Habitat and Ecology

This species is found in lowland coastal forest, and woodland at elevations up to 800 m. It tolerates some degree of habitat alteration if adequate cover is available (Harper et al., 2010).


Author: Zimkus, Breda
License: http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/3.0/

Activity and Special Behaviors

This is considered a ‘tree toad’ for its ability to climb. The vent of the male is spiny and protruding. Fertilization is internal. Eggs are laid in clutches of 8 – 12 often in tree holes, snail shells or coconut shells (Text from Harper et al., 2010).


Author: Zimkus, Breda
License: http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/3.0/

Tadpole morphology

Tadpoles have a fleshy circular crown that allows them to float on the surface of the water. This unusual structure may also aid in respiration, providing greater surface area for gas exchange (Text from Harper et al., 2010).


Author: Zimkus, Breda
License: http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/3.0/