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Nectophrynoides tornieri
Tornier’s Forest Toad, Kijula
family: Bufonidae

© 2011 Iris Starnberger (1 of 2)

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Conservation Status (definitions)
IUCN (Red List) Status Least Concern (LC)
CITES Appendix I
Other International Status None
National Status None
Regional Status None

 

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From the Encyclopedia of Life account:

Etymology

This species is named for Dr. Gustav Tornier, a German zoologist and paleontologist.


Author: Zimkus, Breda
License: http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/3.0/

Morphology

The following is from the original description by Roux (1906):

Habit slender. Head moderate, as long as broad. Snout short, scarcely prominent, obliquely truncate, quite as long as the eye; canthus strong; loreal region vertical, slightly concave in the uppepart. Interorbital space broader than the upper eyelid. Tympanum exposed, vertically oval, about one-third the diameter of tbe eye, The distance between the anterior border of the tympanum and the posterior corner of the eye equal to half the distance between the anterior corner of the latter and the nostril. Fore limb slender, equal in length to the distance between vent and tympanum. Fingers moderate, much depressed, webbed at the base, dilated and truncate at the end, first a little shorter than second. The hind limb being carried forward along the body, the tibio-tarsal articulation reaches the posterior border of the eye. Toes half-webbed, but the three distal phalanges of the fourth toe free. The tips of the toes less stlrongly dilated than those of the fingers . Subarticular tubercles well marked. Two well-developed metatarsal tubercles, the inner the larger. Skin of the upper party of the body and limbs covered with numerous small warts, irregularly distributed; the largest situated behind the tympanum and on the middle of the back; beneath feebly granulate. The granulations are visible on the posterior part of the belly and on the under part of the thighs, and disappear on the throat.

Brown above, with darker markings, especially two pairs on the back: one between the fore limbs, the other on the sacral region. A large lateral dark band from the eye, surrounding the tympanum, which is lighter in colour, and extending on each side of the body. A dark streak from the end of the snout passing below the canthus rostralis, through the eye, and above the tympanum to the commissure of the mouth. Loreal region brown; a light spot below the eye between yellowish-brown parts of the upper lip. Limbs brownish in colour, with darker markings arranged in indistinct large cross bars. Sides of the body below the dark lateral band lighter than the back, more or less speckled with dark brown. Sometimes a yeliowish-brown vertebral stripe extending along the middle of the back, from snout to vent. Beneath entirely white or with a few small dark spots on the
throat and belly.

Dimensions.-From snout to vent, 27 mm.; hind limb, 38; fore limb, 20; length of head, 9; breadth of head, 9.5.


Author: Zimkus, Breda
License: http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/3.0/

Size

Snout-vent lengths range from 21-30 mm (Harper et al., 2010).


Author: Zimkus, Breda
License: http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/3.0/

Diagnostic Description

This is small toad with a wide head and slender body. The dorsum is light brown. The limbs are very thin, and the finger tips are expanded and truncate. The tympanum is small, but distinctly visible (Text from Harper et al., 2010).


Author: Zimkus, Breda
License: http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/3.0/

Comparisons

The widely expanded and truncate finger and toe tips, along with the visible tympanum distinguish this species from most other species in the genus (Text from Harper et al., 2010).


Author: Zimkus, Breda
License: http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/3.0/

Habitat and Ecology

This species is found in lowland and montane forest and forest edges from 300 to 1800 m. It tolerates a moderate amount of habitat degradation and can be found in banana patches (Harper et al., 2010).


Author: Zimkus, Breda
License: http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/3.0/

Activity and Special Behaviors

This species is found perching on low vegetation (Text from Harper et al., 2010).


Author: Zimkus, Breda
License: http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/3.0/

Advertisement Call

Males call while perched on leaves in the forest, usually about 0.5 – 1.0 meters above the ground. The call consists of one, two or three high-pitched clicks (Text from Harper et al., 2010).


Author: Zimkus, Breda
License: http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/3.0/

Reproduction

Fertilization is internal, and eggs are retained in the oviducts where they complete development (Text from Harper et al., 2010).


Author: Zimkus, Breda
License: http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/3.0/