AMPHIBIAWEB
Nectophrynoides wendyae
family: Bufonidae
Conservation Status (definitions)
IUCN (Red List) Status Critically Endangered (CR)
CITES Appendix I
Other International Status None
National Status None
Regional Status None

Country distribution from AmphibiaWeb's database: Tanzania, United Republic of

 

View distribution map using BerkeleyMapper.

   

From the Encyclopedia of Life account:

Etymology

This species is named for Wendy Clarke, wife of the describer, Barry Clarke (Channing and Howell, 2006).


Author: Zimkus, Breda
License: http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/3.0/

Summary

Nectophrynoides is a genus of true toads endemic to Tanzania. Nectophrynoides wendyae is listed as Critically Endangered (CITES Appendix I) due to a restricted range caused by habitat loss.


Author: Zimkus, Breda
License: http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/3.0/

Distribution

This species is known only from the Udzungwa Scarp Forest Reserve, above Chita, on the escarpment of the Udzungwa Mountains, in eastern Tanzania (Menegon et al., 2004).


Author: Zimkus, Breda
License: http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/3.0/

Size

Males are up to 18 mm and females up to 22 mm in snout-vent length (Harper et al., 2010).


Author: Zimkus, Breda
License: http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/3.0/

Diagnostic Description

This is a small Nectophrynoides with smooth skin. There is a distinct dark spot on the chest. The snout projects out over the lips and there is a light line on the upper lip. This species lacks a tympanum. The parotid glands are long and narrow, extending along the dorsum as dorsolateral folds. The undersides of the thighs are dark with prominent white tubercles. The first finger is longer than the second. The first toe is reduced and there is only a very small amount of webbing on the toes. The undersides of the feet are dark brown with contrasting white tubercles. Males in breeding condition have nuptial pads and a red throat (Text from Harper et al., 2010).


Author: Zimkus, Breda
License: http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/3.0/

Comparisons

The dark undersides of the thighs and the presence of white tubercles make this species easily distinguishable from others of the genus (Text from Harper et al., 2010).


Author: Zimkus, Breda
License: http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/3.0/

Habitat and Ecology

This species inhabits the forest floor of undisturbed moist montane forest at elevations from 1500 to 1650 m (Harper et al., 2010).


Author: Zimkus, Breda
License: http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/3.0/

Population Biology

The species is quite common in one tiny area, measuring roughly 300m x 300 m (Menegon et al., 2004).


Author: Zimkus, Breda
License: http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/3.0/

Advertisement Call

This species lacks a tympanum and associated hearing apparatus and is assumed to have no advertisement call (Text from Harper et al., 2010).


Author: Zimkus, Breda
License: http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/3.0/

IUCN Red List Category and Justification of Conservation Status

This species is listed as Critically Endangered because its Extent of Occurrence is less than 100 km2 and its Area of Occupancy is less than 10 km2, it is known from a single location, and the quality and extent of its habitat in the Udzungwa Mountains is declining (Menegon et al., 2004).


Author: Zimkus, Breda
License: http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/3.0/

Trends

Populations of this species are decreasing (Menegon et al., 2004).


Author: Zimkus, Breda
License: http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/3.0/

Threats

The habitat of this species is most likely being lost due to agricultural encroachment, wood extraction, and expanding human settlements (Menegon et al., 2004).


Author: Zimkus, Breda
License: http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/3.0/

Conservation Actions and Management

This species occurs in the Udzungwa Scarp Forest Reserve, but not in any well-protected areas. The population status and trends of this species require monitoring. It is listed on CITES Appendix I (Menegon et al., 2004).


Author: Zimkus, Breda
License: http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/3.0/