AMPHIBIAWEB
Poyntonophrynus fenoulheti
Fenoulhet's Toad
family: Bufonidae
Conservation Status (definitions)
IUCN (Red List) Status Least Concern (LC)
CITES
Other International Status None
National Status None
Regional Status None

Country distribution from AmphibiaWeb's database: Botswana, Mozambique, Namibia, South Africa, Swaziland, Zambia, Zimbabwe

 

View distribution map using BerkeleyMapper.

   

From the Encyclopedia of Life account:

Taxonomic Notes

P. fenoulheti was treated as a subspecies of B. vertebralis by Poynton (1964), but later Poynton and Broadley (1988) identifidied the it as a full species on the basis of the differences in its advertisement call (Text from Minter et al., 2004, © SI/MAB Biodiversity Program).


Author: Zimkus, Breda
License: http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/3.0/

Distribution

Channing (2001) found that P. fenoulheti is present in the north of South Africa, as well as Zimbabwe, eastern Botswana, southern Zambia, Namibia, and Mozambique (Text from Minter et al., 2004, © SI/MAB Biodiversity Program).


Author: Bates, M.F.
License: http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/3.0/

Comparisons



Author: Bate, M.F.
License: http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/3.0/

Habitat and Ecology

P. fenoulheti inhabits a variety of bushveld vegetation types in the Savanna Biome and is occasionally found in adjacent grassland. Its distribution lies within the summer-rainfall region (Text modified from M.F. Bates in Minter et al. 2004, © SI/MAB Biodiversity Program).


Author: Bates, M.F.
License: http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/3.0/

Associations

Often times P. fenoulheti is found with scorpions and lizards (Jacobsen 1989). The adult toads feed on soft-bodied arthropods (Lambiris 1989a). Pienaar et al. (1976) identified that this species is preyed on by the Snouted Night Adder Causus defilippii and Herald Snake Crotaphopeltis hotamboeia (Text from Minter et al., 2004, © SI/MAB Biodiversity Program).


Author: Bates, M.F.
License: http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/3.0/

Metamorphosis

Channing (2001) found that the tadpoles take 19 days to complete their development and undergo metamorphosis (Text from Minter et al., 2004, © SI/MAB Biodiversity Program).


Author: Bates, M.F.
License: http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/3.0/

Advertisement Call

During the breeding season, males have bright yellow throats and call from exposed positions near the edges of rain pools or while partly submerged near the edge (Text from Minter et al., 2004, © SI/MAB Biodiversity Program).


Author: Bates, M.F.
License: http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/3.0/

Reproduction

P. fenoulheti breeds in temporary pools, such as those on flat rocky outcrops or shallow rain ponds, sometimes in barren areas. Breeding occurs after heavy rains from October to February (H. Braack pers. obs.). After breeding strings of eggs are laid. One clutch consisted of only 245 eggs. The eggs hatch after about 24 hours (Text from Minter et al., 2004, © SI/MAB Biodiversity Program).


Author: Bates, M.F.
License: http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/3.0/

Tadpole morphology

Channing (2001) noted that tadpoles feed on algae on the bottom and sides of the pools (Text from Minter et al., 2004, © SI/MAB Biodiversity Program).


Author: Bae, M.F.
License: http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/3.0/

IUCN Red List Category and Justification of Conservation Status

Not considered at risk, P. fenoulheti is found widespread and the habitat appears to be well protected (Text from Minter et al., 2004, © SI/MAB Biodiversity Program).


Author: Bates, M.F.
License: http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/3.0/