AMPHIBIAWEB
Probreviceps macrodactylus
family: Brevicipitidae

© 2007 Robert C. Drewes (1 of 2)
Conservation Status (definitions)
IUCN (Red List) Status Vulnerable (VU)
CITES
Other International Status None
National Status None
Regional Status None

Country distribution from AmphibiaWeb's database: Tanzania, United Republic of

 

View distribution map using BerkeleyMapper.

   

From the Encyclopedia of Life account:

Etymology

This species name is from the Greek 'makros' meaning long and 'dactylos' meaning finger or toe.


Author: Zimkus, Breda
License: http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/3.0/

Distribution

This species is endemic to the Eastern Arc Mountains of Tanzania, and it has been recorded from the Usambara, Nguru, Udzungwa and Uluguru Mountains (Tanzaniaherps.org).


Author: Zimkus, Breda
License: http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/3.0/

Morphology

The following is the decription of Breviceps usambaricus (Barbour and Loveridge, 1928), which was synonymized with Probreviceps macrodactylus by Parker (1934):

Habit is short and stout; head is small. Snout is fairly prominent, measuring 8.1 (6.1 to 8.4 in registered paratype series) times into body length and projecting beyond the lower lip, which is nearly vertical. Eye is small, diameter is 11 times into body length (9 to 15 times in paratype series). Interorbital width is one and a third times the width of the upper eyelid. Tympanum is distinct but ill defined (round and well defined in some paratypes, very difficult to distinguish in young), sub-circular, its diameter about two-thirds that of the eye-opening. Fingers and toes are moderately slender, bluntly rounded at the tips. A series of pads are present beneath the fingers and toes, and a very small tubercle is at each articulation of fingers and toes. Palms of hands have larger blister-like folds; soles of feet have small, rounded, rather indistinct granules. Fourth finger is minutely longer than second (equal to or slightly shorter in paratypes); fifth toe is longer than first. A large (4 mm.) pebble-like inner metatarsal tubercle and a flat, inconspicuous, separated outer metatarsal are present. The tarsal tubercle of the adpressed hind limb reaches the eye (also in 20 of 25 paratypes examined, the tympanic region in No. 13717, the nostril in Nos. 13723, 13724 and 13729). Dorsal skin is rugose or granular frarely almost smooth. Skin on venter is smooth, except edges of chin and soles of feet, which have numerous scattered granules. Coloration in alcohol is uniformly purplish above and on throat. Venter is lighter, variegated with brown and purplish-brown. Some light spots are present on the purplish throat.


Author: Zimkus, Breda
License: http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/3.0/

Size

The female holotype of Breviceps usambaricus measured 65 mm from snout to vent, and the twenty-four paratypes ranged in size from 29 to 60 mm (Barbour and Loveridge, 1928). Males reach 40 mm and large females up to 65 mm in length (Channing and Howell, 2006).


Author: Zimkus, Breda
License: http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/3.0/

Associations

Diet includes ants and beetles (Barbour and Loveridge, 1928). This species is preyed upon by Torneri's cat snake Crotaphopeltis tornieri (Channing and Howell, 2006).


Author: Zimkus, Breda
License: http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/3.0/

Advertisement Call

Males call from burrows or while underneath vegetation after rains. The call is a low-pitched "chirp" at 1.9 kHz, which consists of 12-14 notes in 0.3 sec with a repetition rate of 38 notes/sec (Mkonyi et al., 2004).


Author: Zimkus, Breda
License: http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/3.0/

Reproduction

This species breeds during the small rains in November. Eggs are deposited in the burrow; there is no tadpole stage, eggs develop directly into juveniles (Channing and Howell, 2006).


Author: Zimkus, Breda
License: http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/3.0/